News

New stop amenities database catalogues facilities at Victor Valley Transit bus stops

In continuing efforts provide riders with more information and ensure the accessibility of the Victor Valley Transit bus system, VVTA has been cataloguing stop facility information and building a database of stop amenities for access by customers and use by our staff.

You can check out the database here or from the link on the Getting Started page.

In coming months, VVTA will work to finalize this information and integrate it into the website interactive maps, including links to photographs of the stops so you can see your bus stop before you ride.

Research Finds California Could Lose $100B in Transportation Revenue by 2040 if Voters Repeal Senate Bill 1

The future of California’s landmark Senate Bill 1 (SB1) — the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017 — will be decided at the polls on November 6. Proposition 6 asks voters to choose whether or not to repeal the SB1. But what would be the financial consequence of repealing SB1?

A new report by the Mineta Transportation Institute at San José State University explores this very question. The study projects that, between now and 2040, California will lose approximately $100 billion in transportation revenue if voters repeal SB1. As an example, in 2040, the mean projection is that the state will collect $8.6 billion with SB1 and $3.4 billion without, a $5.2 billion difference. This has significant consequences for the state’s ability to maintain roads, bridges, and address other transportation improvements.

“California’s ability to plan and deliver an excellent transportation system depends upon the state having a stable, predictable, and adequate revenue stream,” said Martin Wachs, lead author for the report. “Californians have an important decision to make on November 6. A decades-long transportation funding crisis left California’s roads badly in need of costly repair and replacement. Without SB1, where will those funds come from?”

The report’s authors – Martin Wachs, Hannah King, and Asha Weinstein Agrawal – project the amount of transportation revenue that the state’s own taxes will raise through 2040 to support transportation services and infrastructure under two scenarios:

  1. Projected revenue streams under current state laws, including provisions adopted in SB1.
  2. Projected revenue streams should SB1 be repealed by voters in the November 2018 referendum, Proposition 6, on the state ballot.

In addition to projecting total revenues that California will collect under both scenarios, the authors project the cost to Californians who drive by estimating revenue paid per registered vehicle. With SB1 in place, the average revenue collected per vehicle will increase from $265 in 2018 to a maximum of $310 in 2020, and then fall to $190 per vehicle by 2040. Should SB1 be repealed, mean projected revenue per vehicle will drop every year, falling to about $74 in 2040.

The report also reviews the history of raising transportation revenue in California and documents public opinion about different transportation revenue options based on evidence from voting outcomes and public opinion research.

“Whether SB1 is repealed or retained by voters in November 2018, transportation revenue will decrease over time due to inflation and, most importantly, because of dramatic increases in fuel efficiency and the widespread adoption of zero emission vehicles,” notes study co-author Hannah King. “Of clear importance to the public is assurance that the revenue is being spent efficiently and on things that they care about such as maintenance, safety improvement, and programs that benefit the environment.”

  1. Projected revenue streams under current state laws, including provisions adopted in SB1.
  2. Projected revenue streams should SB1 be repealed by voters in the November 2018 referendum, Proposition 6, on the state ballot.

In addition to projecting total revenues that California will collect under both scenarios, the authors project the cost to Californians who drive by estimating revenue paid per registered vehicle. With SB1 in place, the average revenue collected per vehicle will increase from $265 in 2018 to a maximum of $310 in 2020, and then fall to $190 per vehicle by 2040. Should SB1 be repealed, mean projected revenue per vehicle will drop every year, falling to about $74 in 2040.

The report also reviews the history of raising transportation revenue in California and documents public opinion about different transportation revenue options based on evidence from voting outcomes and public opinion research.

“Whether SB1 is repealed or retained by voters in November 2018, transportation revenue will decrease over time due to inflation and, most importantly, because of dramatic increases in fuel efficiency and the widespread adoption of zero emission vehicles,” notes study co-author Hannah King. “Of clear importance to the public is assurance that the revenue is being spent efficiently and on things that they care about such as maintenance, safety improvement, and programs that benefit the environment.”

VVTA Board Embraces Battery Electric Buses

The Victor Valley Transit Authority Board of Directors recently approved the purchase of its first Battery Electric Buses (BEBs), the New Flyer Xcelsior XE models, moving forward on the agency’s commitment to operate an all-electric by 2040.

At its May 21, 2018 meeting the VVTA Board approved Resolution Number 18-04 declaring “its commitment to operate a 100% all electric fleet and establish a goal to meet this objective by 2040.”

“The move into battery electric technology is the right move at the right time,” said VVTA Board Member and Barstow Council Member, Rich Harpole. “In FY 18-19 VVTA plans to replace seven (7) CNG buses which have surpassed their service life. By procuring Battery Electric Buses (BEBs), VVTA places itself in a position to have Southern California Edison (SCE) provide all the required electric infrastructure as part of their SCE Charge Ready Transit Bus Program. This alone could save VVTA approximately $2.2M in the cost of bringing power lines and enough electric power to its Hesperia facility.”

The California Air Resources Board (CARB) will be enacting its proposed Innovative Clean Transit (ICT) rule later this year. In response, VVTA plans to get out in front of the regulation to take advantage of all the incentives that are available prior to actual regulation deadlines. For instance, the Hybrid and Zero-Emission Truck and Bus Voucher Incentive Project (HVIP), provides for a rebate of up to $150,000 per bus ordered before the state mandate takes effect. This helps offset the cost differential between a CNG bus and a BEB.

“VVTA analysts have carefully considered its zero-emissions options, reviewing an enormous amount of research and performance data from a number of different agencies to address the critical climate and operational challenges in VVTA’s service area,” commented VVTA Director of Maintenance & Facilities, Ron Zirges. “Factoring in all the unique variables, the steep hills, long distances, extreme weather, and traffic patterns, we are confident in the package we have selected and the limited number of routes these buses will successfully serve.”

With a range of approximately 140 miles between charges, VVTA plans to deploy New Flyer Xcelsior XE models, which will include five 35-foot and two 40-foot buses. Projected operational savings over the 12-year life of these vehicles is expected to be over $125,000 in maintenance savings over conventionally-powered vehicles.

Victor Valley Transit route 31 expands to serve University Prep

In the continuing mission of VVTA to better serve the needs of residents of Victor Valley, the Route 31 has been adjusted to directly serve University Prep in Victorville.

The new bus stops include: the stop (50331) on westbound Seneca Road at El Evado Road; and the stop (50332) on westbound and the stop (50333) on eastbound Seneca Road near the University Prep School crosswalk. The stop (50274) on Palmdale Road at El Evado Road will no longer be served.

These adjustments will allow students of University Prep to take Victor Valley Transit directly to their destination and travel to school with confidence of their arrival time.

VVTA launches a new website!

Thanks for visiting VVTA’s new website, promoting the Victor Valley Transit fixed route services, as well as the flexible transit services offered by VVTA and its many local partners.

On the homepage find three useful rider tools

  • Google Transit Trip Planner
  • Real-time arrivals by stop
  • Service alerts in effect by route

Have questions or comments? Contact us!